Programs and Photographs relating to NAFAD (National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers). African-American Fashion, NAFAD.
Programs and Photographs relating to NAFAD (National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers)
Programs and Photographs relating to NAFAD (National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers)
Programs and Photographs relating to NAFAD (National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers)
Programs and Photographs relating to NAFAD (National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers)
Programs and Photographs relating to NAFAD (National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers)

Programs and Photographs relating to NAFAD (National Association of Fashion and Accessory Designers)

Various: 1958-1965. Three 8 x 10” b/w photographs, and 7 programs.

A small cache of material relating to the African American Women’s Association, which was founded in 1949 in order to further the work of African American fashion designers. The association quickly became widespread in the next couple of decades, with chapters in many American cities.

The pamphlets are programs for designer showcases and conventions, including “America’s Best Dressed Negro Women for 1961” at the Waldorf-Astoria in NYC, as well as showcases in San Francisco, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Detroit, and Boston. These programs are important not only for the numerous b/w photographs of ensembles and designers, but also because each program showcases a number of advertisements for businesses in each city - a remarkable and ephemeral index of African American businesses in several cities of the period.

The first photograph is of a contestant in the 1965 Miss NAFA contestant, with the photographer’s name rubber-stamped at verso (Frederick A. Chew) and the subjects name (Bernetta Davis). There are reproduction instructions on the verso in pencil suggesting that the picture may have been published. The second photograph has a holograph note in ink at verso stating that the subject of the portrait is model Jan Washington, wearing a dress designed by the noted Washington DC area designer Etta Arnold. The third photograph features two women wearing identical outfits, and bears no identifying marks.

All items generally very good with moderate creasing and occasional discoloration (one program has a 1/2" chip to cover), and some light rippling to one of the photographs. Item #22506

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